The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

Email Newsletter icon
Follow us on:
Share Youth Communication Follow Represent on Facebook Follow Represent on YouTube Follow Represent on Twitter
Follow Represent on Facebook Follow Represent on YouTube Follow Represent on Twitter
Juvenile Justice (52 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
author
In the wake of the 17-year-old Trayvon Martin's murder, Geraldo Rivera went on TV to say that black and Hispanic youth shouldn't wear hoodies because it makes them look menacing. Olivia is outraged and argues that Geraldo's logic is demeaning and ridiculous. (full text)
author
After Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer who says he shot in self-defense, Anthony points out that feeling threatened and actually being in danger are two different things. (full text)
author
This imaginative novel about a teen in foster care, pulls you in with its violent, strange, and dramatic plot—and then gets you to think about your own choices. (full text)
author
Alexus reviews Jim St. Germain's vivid story of growing up rough in Brooklyn and straightening his life out during a stay at Boys Town, a residential facility. (full text)
author
Demetria joins a new Black Lives Matter club in her school. She gets frustrated with her small role, but overcomes her impatience for the sake of the cause. (full text)
author
At age 15, Alesha is seduced and then abused by a predator in his 30s. She details how he manipulated her, then how she got free and repaired her damaged self-worth. (full text)
author
S.G.'s birth parents lost custody of her and her brother because they sold drugs in a gang. S.G. kept up with her brother after they went to separate homes and is heartbroken when he too joins the gang. (full text)
author
The writer's childhood was a blur of drug dealing, abuse, death, and chaos. He mourns never getting to "do kid things" and ponders how he'll ever be able to trust. (full text)
author
Bryant joins the youth program Police Explorers, and then gets racially profiled by two officers who haul him down to the station. He explores both sides of the issue of police harassment of young black men. (full text)
author
The author is serving an eight-year sentence in prison and taking college classes while there so she can come out with her bachelor's degree. (full text)
author
Diamonique pays tribute to her two lawyers, who checked in with her, fought for her, gave her good advice, and inspired her to stay out of trouble. (full text)
author
Najet is serving an eight-year term in prison for attempted murder and several other charges. She describes a day inside, including working at the mosque, studying for college classes, and avoiding other inmates. (full text)
author
The author was incarcerated three times, at an after-school outpatient program, at a residential treatment facility, and finally in adult jail on Riker's Island. He explains which punishments inspired him to straighten up. (full text)
author
The author's lust for money gets him in trouble, but he learns to redirect that desire into a plan to become an accountant. (full text)
author
Valencia was full of anger from her abusive upbringing and got into a lot of trouble. Some staff wrote her off, but a judge gave her a second chance. (full text)
author
Chimore wants to have a good credit history because she's about to age out of foster care. Then she finds out that her identity has been stolen and fraudulent credit card accounts opened in her name. (full text)
author
Christopher begins to forgive his mom, and they start family therapy together. (full text)
author
In an interview, Office of Children and Family Services Commissioner Gladys Carrión talks about her efforts to reform New York State’s juvenile justice system. (full text)
author
Although many of his friends are gang members, the writer decides not to join. (full text)
author
Charlene gives into peer pressure from her friends to cut school, drink, and smoke. When they are arrested, she has a change of heart. (full text)
author
The writer thinks jail is a joke—until he gets sent there. (full text)
author
After being arrested for assault, Fred is sent to a residential treatment center, where he eventually learns ways to deal with his anger and his violent past. (full text)
author
The writer won’t stay with her boyfriend if he stays in the Latin Kings. (full text)
author
Juan is torn between watching his friends’ backs and staying out of trouble. (full text)
author
The author meets a guy she really likes and they start going out. Then he plans a “surprise.” (full text)
author
Joseph struggles between angered resentment and love for his older brother, who goes from star student to drug addict and eventually lands in jail. (full text)
author
Sedrick reviews the film Moonlight about a character he's never seen in a movie: "A gay thug, who is big and scary, but who expresses his feelings." (full text)
author
Bryant joins the youth program Police Explorers, and then gets racially profiled by two officers who haul him down to the station. He explores both sides of the issue of police harassment of young black men. (full text)
author
Jaelyn heads down to New York City’s City Hall to cover rally protesting police brutality against black people organized by Millions March NYC, a local group affiliated with Black Lives Matter. (full text)
author
After doing jail time for robbery, the writer begins to reevaluate his life. However, he doesn't make a significant change until his grandmother dies; she had pressed him to leave the street life behind. (full text)
author
When the writer gets locked up in juvenile detention for three months, she uses everything she learned in therapy to stay out of fights. (full text)
author
After the decision not to indict the white police officer accused of killing Eric Garner, who was black, five writers went to their first-ever protest. (full text)
author
The writer's chaotic home life leaves her with uncontrolled rage. She releases her anger by inflicting pain on others, and eventually ends up behind bars. That prompted her to get help by starting therapy. (full text)
author
Najet, who is serving an eight-year prison sentence, describes the mandatory anger management course she has to take while behind bars. (full text)
author
Jovon reviews a film about teens wrongfully convicted in the 1989 Central Park jogger rape case and considers whether the same thing could happen today. (full text)
author
In 1991, one of the wrongfully convicted teens, Raymond Santana, published a poem in our prison newsletter. Meanwhile, teen reporter Tracy Rainford argued that the boys' confessions seemed coerced. She turned out to be right. (full text)
author
Yusef Salaam was convicted and then exonerated in the 1989 rape of a Central Park jogger. Here, he describes the experience. (full text)
author
Catherine is brutally attacked by a girl named Sara, suffering facial fractures as a result. None of the friends they have in common will reveal Sara's full name, so the police can't find her. Catherine wants Sara locked up, not out of revenge, but so she can change her behavior. (full text)
author
Despite a shooting outside her apartment that endangers her aunt, DeAnna's family does not report the incident to the police. "Snitching" goes against the unwritten code of living in the hood—not only will you lose respect from the community, but you could become a target for retaliation. (full text)
author
An interview with Judge Michael Corriero, who explains why he supports alternatives to incarceration. (full text)
author
A brief look at how alternative-to-incarceration programs work. (full text)
author
According to police records, the NYPD stopped 508,540 pedestrians in 2006 for questioning or frisking. The vast majority of those stopped were black or Latino, and 90% weren’t found to be doing anything wrong. Sidebar to previous article. (full text)
author
Getting stopped by the police is common in minority neighborhoods, but when 50 kids get arrested in Bushwick, Brooklyn just for walking down the street, they decide to take action. Helped by an activist curriculum at their alternative school, they successfully sue the police. (full text)
author
Three teen inmates from a secure detention center write about how they ended up there, and where they hope to go. (full text)
author
When Catherine visits the Bronx Residential Center, a juvenile detention facility, the building doesn’t feel like a place to punish people. The Center takes a nurturing approach, matching troubled boys with mental health professionals help them work through their traumas. (full text)
author
In 1998, the police department took over school safety in New York City schools from Dept. of Education staff. Some like the idea, but others feel it creates a prison atmosphere that violates student rights. One critic, the NYCLU, is suing the city to change the policy and remove police from the schools. (full text)
author
New brain research confirms what the writer knows from personal experience—teens have lower impulse control than adults. (full text)
author
The “Missouri model” of juvenile justice emphasizes youth development, rather than harsh punishments—and it’s been highly successful. (full text)
author
Chantal introduces articles about juvenile justice by noting that more than 2,500 prisoners are serving life without parole in the U.S. for crimes they committed before they were 18. No other country in the world does this. (full text)
author
In his book "I Don’t Wish Nobody to Have a Life Like Mine: Tales of Kids in Adult Lockup," David Chura, a former English teacher at the Westchester County jail, shows how the juvenile justice system, instead of rehabilitating traumatized teens, treats them inhumanely. (full text)
author
Outraged by the unfairness of the juvenile justice system, Olivia embarks on a campaign to educate people. (full text)
author
BitTorrent is the new Napster—a method of quickly and stealthily obtaining copyrighted music, movies, games, and software for free. The writer uses it as a convenient and free way to get the movies and music he wants, even though it's illegal to download copyrighted material. (full text)

Visit Our Online Store