The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Issue #221 (May/June 2010) issue cover
Juvenile Justice
Where do we go from here?

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The students at Phillippe’s international high school tend to stick with people of their own nationality. But soccer brings them together. (full text)

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Outraged by the unfairness of the juvenile justice system, Olivia embarks on a campaign to educate people. (full text)

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Chantal introduces articles about juvenile justice by noting that more than 2,500 prisoners are serving life without parole in the U.S. for crimes they committed before they were 18. No other country in the world does this. (full text)

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In his book "I Don’t Wish Nobody to Have a Life Like Mine: Tales of Kids in Adult Lockup," David Chura, a former English teacher at the Westchester County jail, shows how the juvenile justice system, instead of rehabilitating traumatized teens, treats them inhumanely. (full text)

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The “Missouri model” of juvenile justice emphasizes youth development, rather than harsh punishments—and it’s been highly successful. (full text)

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New brain research confirms what the writer knows from personal experience—teens have lower impulse control than adults. (full text)

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In 1998, the police department took over school safety in New York City schools from Dept. of Education staff. Some like the idea, but others feel it creates a prison atmosphere that violates student rights. One critic, the NYCLU, is suing the city to change the policy and remove police from the schools. (full text)

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When Christina gets dropped as a starter on her school's handball team, she decides to give up the sport. Although she sometimes regrets walking away from the team, she also feels she took the best course of action and has moved on to pursue other interests. (full text)

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Whether it’s because they’re not documented, because their houses are illegally overcrowded, or just because they don’t like the idea of sharing personal information, many foreign born Americans will ignore this year’s census. (full text)

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When Catherine visits the Bronx Residential Center, a juvenile detention facility, the building doesn’t feel like a place to punish people. The Center takes a nurturing approach, matching troubled boys with mental health professionals help them work through their traumas. (full text)

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In an interview, Office of Children and Family Services Commissioner Gladys Carrión talks about her efforts to reform New York State’s juvenile justice system. (full text)

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Three teen inmates from a secure detention center write about how they ended up there, and where they hope to go. (full text)

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Getting stopped by the police is common in minority neighborhoods, but when 50 kids get arrested in Bushwick, Brooklyn just for walking down the street, they decide to take action. Helped by an activist curriculum at their alternative school, they successfully sue the police. (full text)

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According to police records, the NYPD stopped 508,540 pedestrians in 2006 for questioning or frisking. The vast majority of those stopped were black or Latino, and 90% weren’t found to be doing anything wrong. Sidebar to previous article. (full text)

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An interview with Judge Michael Corriero, who explains why he supports alternatives to incarceration. (full text)

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A brief look at how alternative-to-incarceration programs work. (full text)

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Despite a shooting outside her apartment that endangers her aunt, DeAnna's family does not report the incident to the police. "Snitching" goes against the unwritten code of living in the hood—not only will you lose respect from the community, but you could become a target for retaliation. (full text)

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Catherine is brutally attacked by a girl named Sara, suffering facial fractures as a result. None of the friends they have in common will reveal Sara's full name, so the police can't find her. Catherine wants Sara locked up, not out of revenge, but so she can change her behavior. (full text)