The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Issue #139 (Winter 2020) issue cover
Addiction Stole My Parent

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Mr. Sweeney of MercyFirst inspires Braulio by sharing his own experiences, discussing different ways Braulio could handle tough situations, and encouraging him. (full text)

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This issue explores parental addiction. Stories show young people figuring out how to protect themselves while hoping for their addicted parent to heal.
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K.G. tries to counteract the terror of seeing her mother disappear into addiction and her discomfort when social workers show up in their home. The first of her three stories in the issue. (full text)

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After inpatient rehab, K.G.'s mom quickly relapses. K.G. realizes that she can't make her mom stop drinking and that she shouldn't keep hiding her situation from others. Second of three stories. (full text)

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Advice from an expert on what young people should know and do if their parents have a substance abuse problem, including how to handle reunifying with parents after leaving foster care. Reprinted from FCYU-2007-09-07. (full text)

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The author's mother abused him when she was drunk and high, and he went into care. An illness in their family makes him realize he'd rather forgive her than stay mad. (full text)

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A.H. interviews Kama Einhorn, creator of Karli, a new Muppet who's in foster care because her mom suffers from addiction. Kama explains how to explain addiction to very young children. (full text)

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For years, the writer's father put alcohol ahead of his family. When he finally enters treatment, he and Jessica are able to connect. (full text)

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This reprint from Rise magazine is by a mom who drank to blur problems in her life and lost her children. She explains how the tough love of a counselor and women's support group helped her get clean. (full text)

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In the third of K.G.'s stories, she evaluates all the interactions she had with child welfare workers around her mother's alcoholism. She turns her experience into useful tips for workers. (full text)

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The writer's mom was very abusive when she drank, and the writer went into care. Her mother slowly got sober, and the family was reunited, but it wasn't a happy ending. (full text)

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The author's mother was in and out of jail and addiction. She reappears just after the writer ages out of care. Hoping for a reconciliation, the author lets her mom move into her apartment. (full text)