The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

Email Newsletter icon
Write for Youth Communication: Video
Behind the Scenes: Teen writers describe what it's like to work at Represent.
Follow us on:
Share Youth Communication Follow Represent on Facebook Follow Represent on YouTube Follow Represent on Twitter
Follow Represent on Facebook Follow Represent on YouTube Follow Represent on Twitter
Writing (18 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
author
Florence dislikes reading until she encounters urban fiction, and then Angela's Ashes, during her sophomore high school year. For the first time, books seem relevant to her own life. Florence is now hooked on reading memoirs and hopes to write her own someday. (full text)
author
Writing and working with an editor helped Zaniyah understand her own anger, forgive herself, and take control of her life. (full text)
author
Precious has been homeless and in foster care. Writing has always helped her cope, so she sets up a website to allow others to share their stories. (full text)
author
The activities help youth structure stories about their own lives and leads them to explore how and for what causes they could become activists. (full text)
author
Otis looks back at writing for Represent for five years and how it's helped him get in touch with his feelings and inspire others. (full text)
author
Hattie strives to change her negative ways of thinking. She reminds herself of her good qualities and does things she enjoys. (full text)
author
Shateek can't control his anger after his grandmother dies. He discovers that writing calms him down. (full text)
author
Writing poetry helps Ashunte control his anger. (full text)
author
After years in foster care, Erica and her mother reestablish a relationship by writing letters. (full text)
author
Stevisha’s father has been in prison since she was a young girl, but they have bonded over the years by writing to each other. (full text)
author
The writer starts keeping a journal in the 9th grade to deal with family problems. By writing and re-reading her diary, she gains a better understanding of herself and how to handle her emotional problems. (full text)
author
By writing and re-reading her diary, the author gains a better understanding of herself and how to handle her emotional problems. (full text)
author
Writing, walking, and going to the beach help Tamara burn off her negative emotions. (full text)
author
Shaniqua starts writing poetry at an early age but the thought of reading it in public scares her. When she notices a cafe that holds readings, she signs up, overcomes her fears, and wins the audience over with her performance. (full text)
author
The writer tries to protect his siblings, mother, and himself from his father’s physical abuse. He discovers that writing is one way to gain a sense of peace and control. (full text)
author
Lisuini has always loved to write, but in 6th grade, boys tease him that writing is girly. He gives it up for several years. (full text)
author
The writer expresses his anger at the foster care system by getting into fights until his therapist encourages him to write rap lyrics to let it out instead. (full text)
author
Daichka doesn't fit in with the other kids at school. She dedicates herself to reading books, and gets the support, acceptance, love, and understanding that she doesn't get from people. (full text)

Visit Our Online Store