The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Behind the Scenes: Teen writers describe what it's like to work at Represent.
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Stigma (14 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Imani notices Facebook posts saying that "THOTs" don't have the right to mourn Maya Angelou's death. Imani questions why women are still put down for being sexual. (full text)
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This writer recounts his mother’s reaction when she learns he’s gay from his guidance counselor, and the fallout that ensues as a result. (full text)
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As an African-American male who grew up in foster care, Orlando feels a double stigma. But he’s determined to succeed in college. (full text)
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The dean at the writer’s school has bigger breasts than she does—and he’s a man. (full text)
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When students discover he can’t read, Antwaun is teased and called a “crack baby.” (full text)
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The writer's beloved aunt has AIDS, but no one in the family can talk about it. (full text)
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Jonathan keeps his opera singing a secret from his friends, for fear he won’t be thought of as “manly.” (full text)
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Years later, the male author still feels deeply ashamed about being raped at age 8. (full text)
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Anne, who lives in a group home, meets Cliff and they soon fall in love. But Anne can't tell Cliff her living situation, nor that her mother is a racist. (full text)
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Mariah, who is transgendered, finds refuge in a group home for gay kids. (full text)
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Diana feels ashamed that her family is on welfare—until she sees what it’s like to pay bills. (full text)
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Omar feels ashamed that the "normal" kids have parents and he's in foster care, so he tries various ways to hide his group home identity. But when his friend Joseph finds out the truth and accepts him, Omar begins to accept himself. (full text)
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Imani is persecuted in grade school for being dark-skinned. Then a book and a famous actress help her claim the word "dark" as one that describes beauty. (full text)
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The author writes about his ongoing exploration of his sexuality and why bisexual is his current placeholder. He says, “concrete and permanent labels don’t describe how we feel during the discovery process.” (full text)

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