Media & Pop Culture (17 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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In the wake of the 17-year-old Trayvon Martin's murder, Geraldo Rivera went on TV to say that black and Hispanic youth shouldn't wear hoodies because it makes them look menacing. Olivia is outraged and argues that Geraldo's logic is demeaning and ridiculous. (full text)
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Ricki interviews author Cris Beam about her new book, To The End of June: The Intimate Life of American Foster Care. Beam talks about her personal interest in the topic and her conclusions about the system. (full text)
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Tayia reviews the TV show This Is Us, which features a family that decides to foster a child. She notes how things can go wrong even when people have the best intentions. (full text)
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Danielle is disgusted by the way mainstream hip-hop disrespects women, and argues that it damages the entire black community. (full text)
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When Brianna visits Khon Kaen through an intercultural exchange program, she learns to be more independent. “This trip helped me discover that despite my natural inclination to be shy, I am capable of doing courageous things.” (full text)
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Nahian notices that TV ads are full of women happily cleaning or half-dressed, while men can't change a diaper. She interviews experts about gender stereotyping in advertising. (full text)
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After the writer realizes she looks nothing like the sexualized, skinny actresses who play teens on TV, she begins to explore her own definition of beauty. (full text)
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In 1991, one of the wrongfully convicted teens, Raymond Santana, published a poem in our prison newsletter. Meanwhile, teen reporter Tracy Rainford argued that the boys' confessions seemed coerced. She turned out to be right. (full text)
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Yusef Salaam was convicted and then exonerated in the 1989 rape of a Central Park jogger. Here, he describes the experience. (full text)
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Trisha dissects how advertisers sell us their products by preying on our emotions and insecurities. (full text)
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Julieta Velazquez challenges common stereotypes about immigrants, questions the contention that immigrants are taking jobs from American citizens, and asks who really profits from illegal immigration. (full text)
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The Parents Television Council reacted with consternation when MTV launched its racy teen series, Skins. Alice, skeptical that the show is "dangerous," interviews peers on their reaction to it and offers concerned parents a solution. (full text)
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While it contains inaccuracies, The Social Network centers on a main character—Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg—who is unquestionably ambitious. Sherilyn considers whether we can draw any lessons from his success. (full text)
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Ebony critiques the usefulness of HotGhettoMess.com, a website that seeks to shame blacks and Latinos who "act ghetto" and perpetuate negative stereotypes about people of color. (full text)
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Nesshell summarizes the Shirley Sherrod story that arose in the national news during the summer. She concludes that the way media and government figures reacted to Sherrod's message bodes badly for prospects of racial healing. (full text)
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Janill interviews fellow high school students to find out what they know about the First Amendment and free speech. She's shocked to find out how ignorant they are about the Constitution and how little appreciation they have for the freedoms it guarantees. (full text)
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An article in a school paper, meant to be a satire poking fun of people who are intolerant of gays, offends the student body and leads to a debate about freedom of the press. (full text)