The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Housing (19 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Otis's mother kicks him out and he ends up in a homeless shelter with much older men who drink, smoke and do drugs. He has a hard time facing the reality of his situation. (full text)
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Sharlene does everything right as she prepares to age out. But things go wrong with her housing, benefits, and college, through no fault of her own. (full text)
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At 28, former Represent writer Natasha has tried all kinds of living situations. A cooperative group house suits her the best. (full text)
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The author raised her son to age 8 while she was in foster care. She's relieved when the two of them finally get their own home after she ages out. (full text)
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Vanessa lives with relatives, friends, in group homes, in an office, in supportive housing, and finally in a market-rate apartment with friends, which is her favorite set-up. (full text)
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When J.G. finally gets her own apartment at age 22, she thinks everything's finally OK. Instead, her years in care haunt her. (full text)
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Psychotherapists Sylvia Lester and Marina Stolerman of The Fostering Connection give tips on how to make a house or apartment a home and how to live on your own. (full text)
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Marlo has lived in an astonishing variety of places and has never known stability. At age 22, he gets an apartment and wonders what "home" and "family" mean. (full text)
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Zaniyah gets pregnant before she ages out, in part to have the family she didn't have in foster care. Her NYCHA apartment has problems, but it does have family. (full text)
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The author invites a pregnant friend and two small children to live with her, giving them her bedroom. It does not work out. (full text)
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The author, who has a son, doesn't learn until she's 19 that she doesn't have a green card. She scrambles to get that before she ages out. (full text)
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Shannon Cleary of the Morningside Heights Legal Services Clinic summarizes the Clinic's upcoming report suggesting ways to help youth aging out get housing. (full text)
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The author recounts the scary countdown to turning 21 with her work hours being cut, her public housing not ready, and her foster mother's commitment shaky. (full text)
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Marlo was homeless several times as a child, with his family. When he becomes homeless again at 18, his concentration and his grades slip. Fortunately, he finds a home. (full text)
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Lavell shares her experience of applying for, then choosing between low-income public housing and supportive housing for mentally ill New Yorkers. (full text)
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Quotesia interviews Mario Mazzoni at the Metropolitan Council, an NYC tenants' rights organization, and finds that the housing crunch is hitting poor people the hardest. (full text)
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Samantha finally gets her own place in a Supported Independent Living Program (SILP). A few months later, ACS closes SILPs and she has to go back to living with a foster parent. (full text)
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At 16, Vanessa moves here from Mexico to escape persecution for being gay. She describes her journey from homelessness to foster care, and finally to stability and independence. (full text)
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Three teens who have been homeless share their stories and offer advice to those who may find themselves in unstable living arrangements. (full text)

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