The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Girls' Issues (20 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Two teens take take on the battle of the sexes after attending a talk by the author of the provocatively-titled book, Man Down: Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt That Women Are Better Cops, Drivers, Gamblers, Spies, World Leaders, Beer Tasters, Hedge Fund Managers, and Just About Everything Else (full text)
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Imani notices Facebook posts saying that "THOTs" don't have the right to mourn Maya Angelou's death. Imani questions why women are still put down for being sexual. (full text)
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The dean at the writer’s school has bigger breasts than she does—and he’s a man. (full text)
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In junior high, Alice joins a clique of girls who make fun of others and eventually reject her. (full text)
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The writer has to deal with offensive comments because of her large chest. (full text)
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Nadishia is tormented at school for not wearing the latest styles. (full text)
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Tichelle and her fellow high school cheerleaders aren't taken seriously and she thinks it's because they're girls. She feels they should get more respect: not only do they pump up the crowd, but cheerleading demands skill, discipline, and lots of practice. (full text)
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Most girls are in a hurry to grow up, but Nicole wants to take it slow. (full text)
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Devastated when her father leaves the family, the writer fills her emptiness by having promiscuous sex. Eventually, she gains control of her sexuality. (full text)
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Anita is raised to believe that being a “good Indian girl” means having long hair. Then she gets a haircut. (full text)
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The writer's family consistently taunts her about her shape and eating habits. She summons the confidence to stand up to their negative talk. (full text)
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When Aishamanne changes schools in 3rd grade, the new girls make fun of her dreadlocks. She begins exploring her historical heritage and learns her dreads are a proud "radical expression of my blackness." (full text)
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Shameera surprises herself when she’s able to remain strong and brave during two natural disasters. Inspired by her courage in handling these situations, she attempts to conquer her biggest fear: public speaking. (full text)
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After the writer realizes she looks nothing like the sexualized, skinny actresses who play teens on TV, she begins to explore her own definition of beauty. (full text)
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Roberta resists the stereotypical female roles placed upon her by her Dominican culture. The writer envisions her older self slaving away in her office writing her novel, not in the kitchen cooking up “the most delicious plate of rice, beans, and chicken.” (full text)
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Isaura compares herself to her curvy classmates, and is intimidated by their critiques of one another's looks. (full text)
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Darlyn interviews Professor Luis Zayas, who studies why Latinas attempt suicide more frequently than other teens, and contemplates his findings. (full text)
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The author, a Muslim girl from Africa, secretly disobeys her father's orders to wear the hijab, despite potentially drastic consequences. (full text)
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Orubba belongs to a family where the women are expected to cook, clean, and raise a family. But she longs to attend college. (full text)
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Angelina has mixed feelings about shaving her legs and underarms. (full text)

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