The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Gender Issues (19 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Two teens take take on the battle of the sexes after attending a talk by the author of the provocatively-titled book, Man Down: Proof Beyond a Reasonable Doubt That Women Are Better Cops, Drivers, Gamblers, Spies, World Leaders, Beer Tasters, Hedge Fund Managers, and Just About Everything Else (full text)
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Andrew notices from an early age that he does not identify with anything heavily gendered, neither masculine nor feminine. On the Internet, he discovers the concept of "non-binary" and finds himself. (full text)
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Chris suffers abuse at home, including his adoptive mom not accepting his gender identity. He nearly gives up on school, but in a small school for kids with emotional challenges, he thrives. (full text)
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Youth Communication's summer workshop on gender led writers to challenge stereotypes of masculinity and femininity. They found that gender roles can limit or even hurt people. (full text)
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The author, born biologically male, never doubts that she's truly female. She travels from Mexico to New York and from bullied boy to confident woman. (full text)
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Selena is pure tomboy until adolescence. Then she dresses girly and likes the male attention. Now her style and her spirit combine masculine and feminine. (full text)
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Chris, born Tia, never liked dressing or acting like a girl. At an LGBTQ meeting, he meets other transgender youth and realizes who he is. (full text)
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Youth make collages illustrating gender roles and how they actually feel. In the other activity, youth use "No Violence, No Silence" to discuss what "being a man" means. (full text)
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The writer questions how our culture defines manhood, particularly how his father defines it. While pursuing his passion for acting, he played a role that helped him develop his own definition. (full text)
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Mariah, who is transgendered, finds refuge in a group home for gay kids. (full text)
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A bisexual trans boy, the writer lives as one person at home with his family, who he cannot come out to, and as another person at school with teachers and friends who are more accepting. (full text)
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Andrew feels different and unaccepted because of his gender identity and sexuality. But after he finds accepting friends online, he gains the confidence to come out in person.
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“Even though I have a man’s body, I have never felt male,” writes J.P. Then during an “identity” activity at his YMCA program, he learns the word gender nonconformer, and “I finally had something to call myself.” (full text)
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Atl writes an opinion piece about why he believes Trump’s announcement to ban transgender people from the military is discriminatory and lacks foundation. (full text)
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Julia writes about her observations of gender roles and sexism in society, and explains why she considers herself a feminist. (full text)
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David is proud to be a black belt in Taekwondo because it’s a martial art that demands athleticism and discipline. But he doesn’t like hurting people. (full text)
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Roberta resists the stereotypical female roles placed upon her by her Dominican culture. The writer envisions her older self slaving away in her office writing her novel, not in the kitchen cooking up “the most delicious plate of rice, beans, and chicken.” (full text)
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Orubba belongs to a family where the women are expected to cook, clean, and raise a family. But she longs to attend college. (full text)
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Paula Giddings' book describes black women's integral role in both the civil rights and feminist movements. (full text)

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