Feminism (37 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Trina doesn't date yet, but looking at those who do, she wants more equality between boys and girls. Boys should not always pay for dates, she says. (full text)
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The author joins a stock trading club at school and does very well. She is treated disrespectfully and eventually pushed out. She has an elegant solution. (full text)
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Youth Communication's summer workshop on gender led writers to challenge stereotypes of masculinity and femininity. They found that gender roles can limit or even hurt people. (full text)
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Selena is pure tomboy until adolescence. Then she dresses girly and likes the male attention. Now her style and her spirit combine masculine and feminine. (full text)
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Hande looks at recent news reports of sexual violence in her home country, Turkey, and explores what's behind men's desire to dominate and control women. (full text)
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E.F. dates a boy who tells her, "I want to make you mine." That makes her feel special, but then he grows controlling and abusive. (full text)
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Men are constantly commenting on Margaret's appearance as she walks down the street. She reports on how widespread—and how damaging to girls—street harassment is. (full text)
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Margaret interviews several people and groups who share strategies on how girls and women can respond to sexual harassers safely but effectively. (full text)
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Imani notices Facebook posts saying that "THOTs" don't have the right to mourn Maya Angelou's death. Imani questions why women are still put down for being sexual. (full text)
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Danielle is disgusted by the way mainstream hip-hop disrespects women, and argues that it damages the entire black community. (full text)
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Grace has been labeled as “trouble” by men since she was 12. She writes about how this label implies girls are to blame for actions by impulsive men who lack self-control. (full text)
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Elia is raised in Kiev, Ukraine in a strict Orthodox Christian family. When she begins to read the Bible closely, she feels it, and God, are discriminatory. (full text)
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“I could not accept a boy talking down to me, acting as if I was not equal to him or deserving of respect,” writes Carolina. (full text)
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The writer begins a relationship with a boy whose confidence she finds attractive. He starts pressuring her to have sex, and begins to treat her poorly when he’s around his friends. (full text)
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YCteen writers talk about how to make the world a more equitable place and move past stereotypes that harm people of all genders. (full text)
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Winnie’s family, particularly her grandmother, pressure her to be submissive, quiet, and spend her adulthood raising children. She finds the courage to stand up to her grandmother’s sexism.
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Ria examines how social media, her family, friends, and other aspects of society has influenced her negative attitudes toward women, including herself. (full text)
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The writer is excluded and mansplained by boys in her school’s stock market trading club. She blames it on what she sees as a sexist culture in finance and creates her own club that is more welcoming to girls. (full text)
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Salenna comes from a Russian family, where there are strict feminine and masculine roles and traditions. One is that women don’t play cards. Baffled, she muses: “Is it because females back in Russia can’t count to 10?”
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As a reporter for her school newspaper, Aishamanne is accused of being angry and “ranting” about race. After discussing this with friends, she concludes it’s important for her to speak her truth, no matter what others think. (full text)
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Teens write about their concerns and fears about President-elect Trump. (full text)
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As Crystal Stevens writes in this review, "Dietland will make you step back and question how women are treated in our society. (full text)
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Imani’s grandmother raised her to “be every inch a lady,” which means having “a dazzling polite smile etched on my face.” But when she discovers basketball, Imani challenges her grandmother’s definition of womanhood. (full text)
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Jovani writes about how his mother, “who wore the pants” in his house, offered a unique perspective; he never thinks of “masculine” things being better than “feminine” things. (full text)
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Imani recalls Facebook posts saying that "THOTs" don't have the right to mourn Maya Angelou's death. Imani questions why women are still put down for being sexual. (full text)
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Jeimmy questions the fairness of her school’s dress code after she’s punished for a violation. She notices that the schoolwide policy only seems to apply to girls. (full text)
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Jeimmy sees parallels between the protagonist Hester Prynne’s humiliation in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic novel, The Scarlet Letter, and her experience getting gym-shorted for violating the school dress code. (full text)
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Not only does Aniqa believe her school's dress code contributes to female oppression, she also notices that mostly girls get called out. She observes boys who are allowed to wear shirts displaying naked photos of women. (full text)
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When Eunisah explores misogyny as part of a journalism assignment, she discovers that the songs she used to "bob my head to and sing along" were rife with lyrics demeaning women. (full text)
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Four YCteen writers discuss how concepts of masculinity or femininity have affected their lives. (full text)
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Boys sexually harass the writer in middle school after she develops. Her friends don't take it seriously and she's too embarrassed to tell her parents. (full text)
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Nahian notices that TV ads are full of women happily cleaning or half-dressed, while men can't change a diaper. She interviews experts about gender stereotyping in advertising. (full text)
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Hande looks at recent news reports of sexual violence in her home country, Turkey, and explores what's behind men's desire to dominate and control women. (full text)
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Julia writes about her observations of gender roles and sexism in society, and explains why she considers herself a feminist. (full text)
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Roberta resists the stereotypical female roles placed upon her by her Dominican culture. The writer envisions her older self slaving away in her office writing her novel, not in the kitchen cooking up “the most delicious plate of rice, beans, and chicken.” (full text)
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The author, a Muslim girl from Africa, secretly disobeys her father's orders to wear the hijab, despite potentially drastic consequences. (full text)
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Angelina has mixed feelings about shaving her legs and underarms. (full text)