The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Diversity And Cultural Competence (11 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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The recession of 2008-2011 is the latest setback for Marco’s father, an immigrant who hoped to find financial stability when he came to the U.S. 20 years ago. (full text)
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Natasha interviews minority teens in the suburbs to explore the relationship between race and success. (full text)
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Sandra’s friends have lots of stereotypes about lesbians—but Sandra’s gay sister proves them wrong. (full text)
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Brief comments from Queens teens on what it's like to live in America's most diverse county. (full text)
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After talking to author Adam Mansbach, Evin realizes that white people in America still enjoy certain advantages. (full text)
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Renea reports on a series of studies that show how our brains are hard-wired to categorize people by race. She explains that, although some biases may come naturally, there are easy ways to counteract them and become more open to people who are different from us. (full text)
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Kelly explains the historical origins of the idea of race, which has no basis in science. She argues that we should be taught to appreciate our essential sameness as well as our differences, since moving beyond race will make it more possible for people to be judged by their actions. (full text)
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YCteen interviews three experts on race: Rinku Sen, a racial justice activist; Lasana Harris, a neuroscientist who studies how our brains process race; and Dalton Conley, a sociologist and author of the memoir "Honky." (full text)
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Evin's parents warn him to avoid certain neighborhoods and he develops a wariness toward anyone from the "ghetto." It's not until he befriends kids from hood that he learns to separate "bad neighborhoods" from the people who live there. (full text)
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Janill, who is Ecuadorian, is bothered when people assume she’s Puerto Rican or Dominican. (full text)

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