The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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College Life (10 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Anthony had a rough childhood and often retreated into daydreams to escape abuse. As he grows up, he pushes himself to live more in reality. (full text)
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Marlo was homeless several times as a child, with his family. When he becomes homeless again at 18, his concentration and his grades slip. Fortunately, he finds a home. (full text)
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A college visit is a wake-up call for Edgar, who realizes that to succeed he will have to take more responsibility for his education. (full text)
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Matthew became overwhelmed in college and decided to drop out. With a better sense of what it takes to succeed, he’s now back in school. (full text)
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Kizzy is nervous about attending an overwhelmingly white school in Minnesota. But once on campus she makes friends of all races. (full text)
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When Tamecka goes away to college, she begins missing classes and failing exams, and her first inclination is to blame her foster care background. (full text)
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Nhi is convinced she wants to be a journalist until she gets to college. Taking sociology and business courses and joining a college club makes her think about changing majors. (full text)
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As an African-American male who grew up in foster care, Orlando feels double stigma. But a professor's comment makes him determined to succeed in college. (full text)
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Many New York City high school grads need extra help before they're ready for college classes. This can hurt their chances of ever earning a degree from CUNY or other colleges. (full text)
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Samantha, who is black, has a difficult adjustment to the overwhelmingly white University of Michigan. (full text)

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