The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Birth Family (20 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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E.F. looks back on her mother's abuse and her own fighting at school. She is placed with her grandmother at age 11, goes to therapy, and learns to handle her own feelings. (full text)
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The author has been in care most of his life. He loves his biological parents and sees them often, but gets more support and encouragement from his foster mom. (full text)
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The author is forced by her mother and stepfather to be the maid and nanny to her younger half-siblings. In kinship care, she's allowed to be a child again. (full text)
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The author is removed from her abusive mother at age 11, and starts therapy. It's good for several years, but as she grows up, she needs a therapist who's less parental. (full text)
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Shateek feels alone in the world until he meets his therapist Fall. She shows interest in his writing and sports and listens to him, and he turns his life around. (full text)
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Robert describes how his therapist helped him face the pain from his father's abuse, neglect, and abandonment. She also helps Robert envision a better future. (full text)
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Anthony had a rough childhood and often retreated into daydreams to escape abuse. As he grows up, he pushes himself to live more in reality. (full text)
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Shateek and Amadou talk about their feelings and keep each other's secrets. They don't let a couple of fights destroy their friendship. (full text)
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The author was incarcerated three times, at an after-school outpatient program, at a residential treatment facility, and finally in adult jail on Riker's Island. He explains which punishments inspired him to straighten up. (full text)
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Camilla's biological mother is uncooperative with foster care staff. Camilla must figure out how to draw boundaries to maintain a relationship. (full text)
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Andrew’s therapist helps him deal with his anger and sadness about not living with his family. (full text)
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Jarel’s grandmother adopts him after years in foster care, but they still have a rocky relationship. (full text)
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After her biological mother disappears, Lishoné has a hard time adjusting to her adoptive family. (full text)
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Shateek can't control his anger after his grandmother dies. He discovers that writing calms him down. (full text)
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After running away and going into foster care, Daniel is determined to repair his relationship with his mother. (full text)
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Although she’s spent years in foster care, the author fears losing her identity if she is adopted. (full text)
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When Janelle returns home after three years in foster care, she finds it hard to readjust. Family therapy helps her and her mother build a new and better relationship. (full text)
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After years in foster care, Erica and her mother reestablish a relationship by writing letters. (full text)
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The writer, whose mother was 16 when she gave birth to her, argues that the children of teen moms often don’t receive the support they need. (full text)
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Angela goes into care after being molested by her father. She's relieved to find a group home that provides her with the structure and safety she never got at home. (full text)

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