The youth-written stories in YCteen give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Asian-americans (16 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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When Zaineb arrives in the U.S. from Pakistan, she faces pressure to abandon her cultural beliefs. (full text)
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The Moon Festival celebration reminds Chun Lar of the family and traditions she’s left behind in China. (full text)
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When George, who is Chinese, moves to the Bronx, he is frequently taunted by black kids. But after a black youth befriends and defends him, George moves beyond his stereotypes. (full text)
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Anita is raised to believe that being a “good Indian girl” means having long hair. Then she gets a haircut. (full text)
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Sue’s boyfriend tells her that if she were a “real” Korean girl, she would listen to him when he told her what to do. (full text)
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On the subway to Queens one day, Anna remembers taking the same ride when she was just eight years old and in America for only two months. She reflects back on what she has gained and lost as an immigrant from Korea, but as her ride ends she knows she's finally home. (full text)
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Winnie’s family, particularly her grandmother, pressure her to be submissive, quiet, and spend her adulthood raising children. She finds the courage to stand up to her grandmother’s sexism.
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“Being Chinese felt like a bad kind of different, like a crack in a wall,” writes Winnie. Determined to push back against the racist remarks she encounters, Winnie takes action and writes a play. (full text)
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Farhana finds her South Asian parents more liberal than most, but still thinks they’re overprotective. She talks to them about needing more independence. (full text)
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Austin wrestles with the pressure he gets from friends based on an Asian stereotype. "You're made to be good in math," they say. (full text)
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When the writer and her family move from Vietnam to Manhattan, her mother begins taking her frustrations out on her. But the writer understands that her mother feels isolated and lonely. (full text)
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Here several teens share their experiences in an effort to help others move beyond ignorance, fear, and stereotyping of Muslims. (full text)
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After the writer moves from Korea to the U.S., his once fun-loving dad struggles to adjust to his new life here, and becomes perpetually angry and demanding. (full text)
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Nhi’s first days in the U.S. are frustrating and unnerving. When she makes an effort to be social, her willingness to step outside her comfort zone is rewarded. (full text)
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When David moves from Seoul, Korea to Flower Mound, Texas, he feels like he’s been transported to another planet. He describes his adjustment to America in vivid and humorous detail. (full text)
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Jimmy, who is Asian-American, becomes friends with a Puerto Rican classmate and they visit several of the city's Puerto Rican neighborhoods together. Jimmy learns to appreciate another culture and develops a new appreciation for his own Chinese background. (full text)

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