The youth-written stories in Represent give inspiration and information to teens in foster care while offering staff insight into those teens’ struggles.

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Arab-americans & Muslims (15 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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Victor points out that likely presidential nominee Donald Trump plays on Americans' fear of ISIS in his attacks on immigrants. But he is an extremist who incites violence. (full text)
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Isma is a religious Muslim who reads the Qur’an and prays daily. She also loves punk rock. (full text)
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When Zaineb arrives in the U.S. from Pakistan, she faces pressure to abandon her cultural beliefs. (full text)
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As a Muslim teen who dresses traditionally, Sara becomes an object of attention after 9/11 and gets harassed on the street. (full text)
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After putting up with insults and stereotyping for most of her life, Ruby decides to speak out to dispel untruths about Muslims. (full text)
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Yazan, a 17-year-old Syrian with an easy smile, is currently living in a refugee camp in Greece, after fleeing his war torn city of Aleppo. (full text)
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"Not allowing people into our country who are in search of a better life, like my family, is inhumane," writes Melanie Mata, whose family immigrated from the Dominican Republic in the 1900s. (full text)
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“Some people don’t want Syrian refugees to come here. But we need to help them,” writes Jaelyn. That 17-year-old Nujeen is also wheelchair-bound makes her journey from Syria to Germany even more dramatic. (full text)
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After Yousef, a Muslim, faces ignorant comments from peers and his teacher about Islam, he speaks up. However, Trump's anti-Muslim speech stokes his anxiety. (full text)
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“Before I read The Kite Runner,” Hoa writes, “I thought Afghanistan was only a terrorist haven. Now I realize it’s a country with people who are just like me.” (full text)
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After being sexually abused throughout her life by numerous men in her family, the writer meets other young women and learns that her experience is common in her South Asian culture. (full text)
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Here several teens share their experiences in an effort to help others move beyond ignorance, fear, and stereotyping of Muslims. (full text)
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The author, a Muslim girl from Africa, secretly disobeys her father's orders to wear the hijab, despite potentially drastic consequences. (full text)
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Orubba belongs to a family where the women are expected to cook, clean, and raise a family. But she longs to attend college. (full text)

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