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Teacher Lesson Return to "Princess Oreo Speaks Out"
Princess Oreo Speaks Out
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Acting White

Dwan Carter, Cynthia Recio and Janill Briones are all accused of “acting White” because of the way they dress, or talk, or the music they listen to. Each of these writers rejects the idea that they cannot talk or dress as they like or listen to certain music because it is typically associated with White people.

What do your students think? Is Princess Oreo really an Oreo (that is, is she denying her Blackness and trying to be White, or is she just trying to be herself?). Does the fact Cynthia and Janill don’t want to wear chest hugging tops, or speak standard English, make them less Latina?

What about Satra Wasserman? Is he White? Black? Or something else? He says that he identifies with no particular group—that his friendships are based on interests, not race. Is that possible?
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[Other Teacher Resources]
(NYC-2004-01-11)

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