African-americans (33 found)
Note: These stories are from Represent and its sister publication, YCteen, which is written by New York City public high school students.
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In the wake of the 17-year-old Trayvon Martin's murder, Geraldo Rivera went on TV to say that black and Hispanic youth shouldn't wear hoodies because it makes them look menacing. Olivia is outraged and argues that Geraldo's logic is demeaning and ridiculous. (full text)
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After Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch volunteer who says he shot in self-defense, Anthony points out that feeling threatened and actually being in danger are two different things. (full text)
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Demetria joins a new Black Lives Matter club in her school. She gets frustrated with her small role, but overcomes her impatience for the sake of the cause. (full text)
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Bryant joins the youth program Police Explorers, and then gets racially profiled by two officers who haul him down to the station. He explores both sides of the issue of police harassment of young black men. (full text)
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Jazmine connects bell hooks' insights on class and race to what she sees around her and suggests ways for poor people of color to organize. (full text)
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Christina feels unconnected to her name. She doesn't know her father, her mother abused her, and her last name can probably be traced back to slavemasters. She tries out some new names. (full text)
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Activities for groups include writing about their names and exploring oppression and prejudice in the story "The Fairest of Them All" and their own lives (full text)
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Chimore ponders how other black people use the "n" word lightly and jokingly. The word's history as a tool of oppression ultimately keeps her from joining them in using this or any slur. (full text)
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Danielle is disgusted by the way mainstream hip-hop disrespects women, and argues that it damages the entire black community. (full text)
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James conducts a brief lesson in African-American history, in the form of a quiz. We learn about the first African-American to earn an international pilot's license, in addition to more well-known greats from the past. (full text)
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As an African-American male who grew up in foster care, Orlando feels a double stigma. But he’s determined to succeed in college. (full text)
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At April’s school, students segregate themselves by hanging out in different hallways according to race and ethnicity. (full text)
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When she enters 7th grade as the only black student in her class, Desiree is thrown into confusion about her racial identity. (full text)
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When Antwaun returns to Harlem after living in a safer, more middle class neighborhood in Queens, he realizes how far he's traveled from his roots. (full text)
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Natasha interviews minority teens in the suburbs to explore the relationship between race and success. (full text)
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Dwan is teased by fellow blacks for “acting white” and wonders why people can’t be more open-minded. (full text)
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Angelina feels out of place at the elite private school she attends where she’s one of the only black students. (full text)
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Jamal speaks standard English, can’t dance, and prefers baseball to basketball. Does this mean he’s less black than his peers? (full text)
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Allen's family and friends call each other "n-gga" all the time and it isn't until the 4th grade that he learns the racist meaning of the word. He's been confused about whether or not to use it ever since. (full text)
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Ria examines how black people have been historically oppressed from after the Civil War to the present. “Slavery and legal segregation are still affecting us,” she writes. (full text)
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In grade school, Gaby is often called an Oreo and writes, “I began to feel as if I wasn’t black. That I was an outsider in my own race.” (full text)
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As a reporter for her school newspaper, Aishamanne is accused of being angry and “ranting” about race. After discussing this with friends, she concludes it’s important for her to speak her truth, no matter what others think. (full text)
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When Aishamanne changes schools in 3rd grade, the new girls make fun of her dreadlocks. She begins exploring her historical heritage and learns her dreads are a proud "radical expression of my blackness." (full text)
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Bryant joins the youth program Police Explorers, and then gets racially profiled by two officers who haul him down to the station. He explores both sides of the issue of police harassment of young black men. (full text)
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Aniqa reports on racism experienced by black students in her school. When a #hashtag is created to inspire students to speak out, the school community must confront difficult issues. (full text)
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Imani is persecuted in grade school for being dark-skinned. Then a book and a famous actress help her claim the word "dark" as one that describes beauty. (full text)
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After Lisuini learns the history of the ‘n’ word, and “how it was used to abuse and demean black people,” he decides to drop it from his vocabulary. (full text)
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Andre says he feels like he has more in common with a white runner or writer than he does a black hip hop artist. (full text)
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Desmin doesn’t just look like Tupac Shakur; they both grew up in Harlem with single mothers who struggled with crack addiction. Both also used writing to inspire readers to “do better in life.” (full text)
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Chimore ponders how other black people use the "n" word lightly. The word's history as a tool of oppression ultimately keeps her from joining them in using this or any slur. (full text)
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After being mugged by two black boys, Chantal—who is African-American, herself—starts to think that racial profiling is justified if personal safety is at stake. (full text)
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In junior high school, Nesshell was ostracized by her peers for "acting white." More recently, she was taunted and called the N-word by white kids in a chat room. Labeled on both sides, she wonders in frustration whether people are capable of seeing her for herself. (full text)
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Brendy knows almost nothing about Frederick Douglass until he attends a play about him. Learning about the ex-slave turned civil rights activist inspires Brendy not only to finish college, but to someday work for social change in his community. (full text)